ECD man goes berserk

first_img…injures 3 personsA man who was said to be mentally unstable, went berserk on Friday evening around 19:00h at a supermarket at Foulis, East Coast Demerara, causing at least three men to be injured in the process.Injured: Reyaaz KhanOne resident of the said area, Reyaaz Khan, 43, was on his way with his wife, Twinkle, to make a purchase at the supermarket when the man dealt the 43-year old a cuff to his face.The man immediately began bleeding and was taken to the Enmore Police Station where a report was lodged. However, as a result of the injuries Khan sustained, the officers at the Police Station encouraged him to seek medical attention.The man’s wife told Guyana Times that her husband was taken to the Mahaicony Diagnostic Centre that evening, where they were told that he requires a CT scan.He was referred to the Georgetown Public Hospital and only received treatment hours later before being sent away. Khan, who suffered a broken cheek bone, is expected to undergo surgery.The man’s relatives are however calling for swift action to be taken against the aggressor who is a known troublemaker in the area.According to residents, the man would usually get away with unlawful acts since one of his immediate relatives is affiliated with members of the Guyana Police Force.Guyana Times was told that it was after much persuasion that the man was arrested and is currently assisting with the investigation.last_img read more

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Trojans fall victim to struggling Sun Devils

first_imgTEMPE, Ariz. – Tim Floyd warned his team as early as last Monday that a dangerous opponent was upcoming. That he was talking about last-place Arizona State when the Trojans hadn’t won on the road at Arizona in 22 years was a bit perplexing, but he apparently knew what he was talking about. With a chance to reach 20 victories Sunday and all but lock up a spot in the NCAA Tournament, the Trojans instead became the first team to lose to the Sun Devils in Pacific-10 Conference play. ASU pulled away from No. 22 USC for a 68-58 upset at Wells Fargo Arena. “It’s very, very, very disappointing,” USC forward Nick Young said. USC led 32-23 three minutes into the second half, then were outscored 45-26 for the remainder of the game. “You have so much going on in your head, like you don’t want to get this loss,” Young said. “… We didn’t settle down.” The Sun Devils went on a quick 10-0 run to take the lead, started by a dunk from Jeff Pendergraph and finished with a 3-pointer from Derek Glasser. Glasser, a freshman point guard from Artesia High who backed out of an oral commitment to USC in order to attend Arizona State, hit another 3-pointer to finish off a 7-0 run that put the Sun Devils ahead 47-39 with 6:22 left. Arizona State’s zone defense frustrated USC from there. Young had just two of his 11 points in the second half. Freshman forward Taj Gibson was held scoreless for the first time. Gabe Pruitt led the Trojans with 22 points, and Lodrick Stewart added 18. With the loss, USC drops into a tie with Stanford for third place in the conference. “It’s a black eye for us but we know there’s a couple of more games ahead of us so we have to keep fighting,” Gibson said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img ASU (7-19, 1-14) was on the verge of becoming the first team ever to go winless in the Pac-10. However, the Sun Devils’ last five losses were all by six points or less. Arizona St. 68, USC 58Thursday: vs. Stanford Galen Center, 7:30 p.m. KSPN/710 last_img read more

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Lasorda true blue again

first_imgThe answer is a mix of the obvious, inevitable and – for Lasorda’s many fans – gratifying. The much-gossiped-about sex allegation, in the book chapter with his purported response when Gibson asks “what you’re looking for,” weigh heavily on a grandfather worried about his family’s feelings even as he suppresses a fight-back instinct in the hope the story will die. His legs hurt because of a nerve in his back and maybe because of his weight, which is why the one-time Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher, who will turn 80 on Sept. 22, called a spring-training-long pause in his perpetual speaker’s tour. But at his emotional home, in the world of baseball and the Dodgertown complex he has been coming to since 1949, he seems to feel as fulfilled as he’s been in the 10-plus years since he managed. Amazing how good a proud man can feel when he works with people who talk and listen to him. It wasn’t always this way, as Lasorda went from manager to general manager to vice president to his current position – third on the front-office roster below Frank and Jamie McCourt – as “special advisor to the chairman”; as the ownership changed hands from Peter O’Malley to the Fox Group to the McCourts; as the general manager’s office spun from Kevin Malone to Dan Evans to Paul DePodesta to Ned Colletti. On a sunny day, he drove and talked, telling the rare Lasorda story that lacks a punchline. “When I retired (in 1996),” Lasorda said, “Peter O’Malley told everybody, `He’s going to be able to help each of you, in all departments. But I don’t want you to overload him.’ That was the thing: They were going to utilize my expertise. Then a new regime came in, and they never wanted to utilize my expertise. They never asked me about players or anything like that. I always felt that’s not my problem, that’s their problem. I’m here to help, and if they don’t (want it), fine. “Then McCourt came in. When he was in process of getting the club, he said he wanted to see me. I flew to Boston, and I’ll never forget it – I froze my ass off. He said, `If I get the club, I want you.’ I said, `Frank, you got me.’ Well, he brought this feeling back to me. He talked to me, and he listened to me. “Bob Daly was here fiveyears (running the Dodgers for Fox), and never once did he ask me about a ballplayer. And listen to this: Prior to that I must have had lunch with him 20 times, and he asked me about every ballplayer you can think of. So when he came in (as owner), I thought, `This guy’s going to lean on me.’ (The GMs) were nice to me, but they didn’t take me as I wanted to be. “I don’t want to be hanging around here just because of who I am. I want to be here because I can help and I know the game and I work at it and I go see the minor leaguers. … It means an awful lot to me.” Lasorda stopped the golf cart at a field where pitchers took batting practice, called over Chad Billingsley and gave the 22-year-old his standard speech about how “talent that is used develops – talent that isn’t used wastes away.” Driving away, he turned the principle to his own post-managing career. “I have the ability to help,” Lasorda said. “I don’t want to see that waste away.” Lasorda’s immediate successors in the dugout, such as Bill Russell, failed to see how they could show him the respect he craved without allowing him to run a shadow managership. Jim Tracy figured it out. Lasorda thanks the McCourts, GM Ned Colletti, assistant GM for scouting Logan White and manager Grady Little for making him feel welcome again. He recounted a conversation with Colletti during the Dodgers’ winter promotional caravan. “Ned called me aside and said, `I want you in the meetings, I want your advice,”‘ Lasorda said. “I went home and said (to his wife), `Jo, he made me feel great today.”‘ White says Lasorda has been “like the father I didn’t have.” White’s dad died when he was a kid. “He’s helped me with how to handle things, scouting or handling personnel,” said White, who values Lasorda’s advocacy for the organization’s scouts and his role as the famous voice in congratulatory phone calls to draftees and their parents. “He’s been huge in signing players.” White added: “I don’t want to tout myself, but I think I was smart enough to know he’s a resource. Why wouldn’t you?” Maybe the Babydol Gibson headlines were sent from out of the blue to force us to consider the complexities behind the cartoon image of Santa Claus Tommy. He’s still boisterous, but can be seen nodding off as he watches games. One thing the McCourt regime has done for him is to keep an employee with Lasorda in every public moment. He’s a Hall of Famer (pleased to be told this week he’s the only Hall of Fame manager who was a pitcher), yet he hungers for the approval of the less-decorated members of the front office. Asked why, he said, “That is something I don’t know.” And he’s fiercely protective of his reputation, even though it’s probably damaged less than he thinks by the Babydol Gibson claim. In the hour or so I was with him the other day, none of the dozens of fans he encountered made any mention of that tempest. I asked if he’d be satisfied if people said: He may or may not have done it. Nobody ever said he was a saint. It’s a private matter for him and his family. Leave Tommy alone. “I don’t want them to say that,” Lasorda said. “I want them to say, `I know Tommy, and he wouldn’t do that.”‘ Not one who is self-conscious, Lasorda traverses Dodgertown, almost always in his No.2 uniform. After a few years during which team management treated him like a mascot, he seems to be welcome again at the batting cages, in the clubhouse, in the meetings – recognition not just for being a master motivator but also having a little knowledge to share after 58 years in the game. For Lasorda and the McCourts, there’s mutual benefit. Keep Lasorda happy, and he’ll talk up your virtues louder and longer than an entire PR firm. Indeed, he said he’s happy in his work again. Maybe this isn’t worth writing a book about, but amid the recent tumult it’s worth his fans knowing that he seems to have attained the most important thing he has been looking for. “When I left (managing), this was the way it was supposed to be,” Lasorda said. “I don’t know what word I can use. (Frank McCourt) gave me my credibility back.” Kevin Modesti’s column appears in the Daily News three days a week. heymodesti@aol.com (818) 713-3616 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VERO BEACH, Fla. Now let’s talk about what Tom Lasorda is really looking for: Appreciation. Credibility. center_img Respect. Put that in your dirty book, Babydol. “Respect, that’s a good word (for it),” Lasorda said one morning last week, describing his quest of the past decade. Lasorda spoke while steering a golf cart among the practice diamonds and gathering spots of Dodgertown, braking only about 400 times during our ride-along interview to sign autographs, pose for pictures, greet old friends, coo to little babies and exhort young ballplayers. I’d hopped aboard to find out how the Dodgers’ Hall of Fame ex-manager and eternal icon is doing since he recently was forced to deny the nasty innuendo in a kiss (and more)-and-tell memoir by self-described Hollywood Super Madam Jody “Babydol” Gibson. last_img
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Five potential breakout World Cup stars

first_img0Shares0000Mexico’s Hirving Lozano has been compared to Uruguay’s Luis Suarez © AFP/File / YURI CORTEZMOSCOW, Russian Federation, Jun 14 – Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo and Neymar are all aiming to leave an indelible mark on the World Cup but with billions watching, it is the perfect stage for a new generation to showcase their talents.AFP Sport looks at five players who could emerge as breakout stars in Russia. Hirving Lozano (Mexico)Temperamental but extremely gifted, Hirving Lozano followed in the footsteps of a number of Latin American stars by swapping home for an introductory taste of European football in the Netherlands. He hit 17 goals in 29 games in his debut season abroad as PSV Eindhoven won the Dutch title and has drawn comparisons with Luis Suarez — both for his ability and disposition — while placing Europe’s bigger clubs on alert. He has a knack for the spectacular, scoring the winner for Pachuca minutes into his professional debut, while needing just half an hour to find the net for PSV. At 22, the hope is “Chucky” will mature given time, with Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio counting on him to sparkle.Goncalo Guedes (Portugal)Portugal’s Goncalo Guedes in action for Valencia © AFP/File / MIGUEL RIOPAOffloaded to Valencia on loan after finding himself stuck behind a queue of talent at Paris Saint-Germain, Goncalo Guedes played just one minute of Portugal’s qualifying campaign. After a frustrating yet brief spell in France, a brilliant start with his new club in La Liga thrust him back into the national team spotlight. The 21-year-old scored five goals and laid on 11 assists to help Valencia earn a place in the Champions League, and struck twice in his country’s final World Cup warm-up match against Algeria to further advance his case for a starting berth in Russia. Powerful and capable of slashing through defences, whether by dribbling or passing, Guedes could leave PSG with a fight on their hands to keep hold of a talent whose potential is far from fulfilled.Timo Werner (Germany)Germany forward Timo Werner has made an impressive start to his international career © AFP/File / Patrik STOLLARZRegarded as the heir to Germany’s record goalscorer Miroslav Klose, Timo Werner already boasts vast Bundesliga experience and a tendency to deliver on the big occasions. The 22-year-old was the top scorer at last year’s Confederations Cup, won by Germany, and a return of seven goals in 12 appearances since his international debut in March 2017 suggests he will be a mainstay in the national team for the next decade. Armed with searing pace — he was clocked running 100 metres in 11.1 seconds — the RB Leipzig forward is a constant threat on the counter and thrives by hanging on the shoulder of the last defender. A deep run by Germany in Russia could set Werner up for a shot at the tournament’s golden boot.Sardar Azmoun (Iran)Sardar Azmoun has a long way to go to eclipse compatriot Ali Daei’s world record of 109 international goals © AFP/File / OZAN KOSESardar Azmoun has been piling up the international goals for an Iran squad that has regularly superseded expectations. With 23 international goals in just 32 games, the 23-year-old is already fifth on Iran’s list of all-time leading scorers. Azmoun was a standout volleyball player as a teenager before concentrating solely on football, and uses his athleticism and acceleration to great effect. He was snapped up by Rubin Kazan in 2013 and while Arsenal and Liverpool have reportedly showed interest in the past, he remains in Russia. He will team up with Alireza Jahanbakhsh, who became the first Asian to finish as the Dutch league’s top scorer this season, as Iran try to punch above their weight in a section featuring Portugal and Spain.Hakim Ziyech (Morocco)Morocco midfielder Hakim Ziyech is greeted by fans in Voronezh, Russia © AFP / FADEL SENNAA Dutch youth international, Hakim Ziyech ultimately elected to represent Morocco rather than the country of his birth in 2015. It was a decision blasted by Netherlands great Marco van Basten but one that helped Morocco end a 20-year World Cup absence. An attacking midfielder with the facility to penetrate the opposition, he is the fulcrum in an underrated Morocco side and has an eye for goal, finding the net eight times in 15 matches. Two prolific seasons at Twente earned him a move to Ajax in 2016 but the 25-year-old is looking for a new challenge after landing the league’s player of the year award and will be desperate to prove his value in Russia.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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No 2013 shame, Mwendwa, Musonye assure ahead of CECAFA

first_imgCECAFA Secretary General Nicholas Musonye is confident that all plans are in tip top shape ahead of the tournament which kicks-off on Sunday afternoon with the opening ceremony set for the Bukhungu Stadium in Kakamega.“We are working as a unit; the Local organizing Committee, FKF, counties and the government. Everything is in place and I want to assure you that this will be the best tournament we will organize. We are combining forces together with broadcast sponsors Azam as well and we will not have any budgetary shortcomings whatsoever,” Musonye noted.Football Kenya Federation President Nick Mwendwa (left) with CECAFA Secretary General Nick Musonye (right) during the briefing of the first briefing of the 2017 CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup on Wednesday, November 7, 2017 at the goal project Kasarani. Photo/ RAYMOND MAKHAYAFootball Kenya Federation boss Nick Mwendwa admitted as much that the memories of 2013 still hang in their heads even though they were not in office, has assured they have put measures in place to ensure that everything runs smoothly.“The big issue has always been about accommodation. We are working round the clock to ensure there are no problems and we are putting in a lot of work to make sure we will not have challenges. Of course there will be a few but we are committed for a successful tournament,” Mwendwa noted.He added; “You will not hear a team stranded in hotels or training grounds or referees stranded anywhere. We have taken care of things.”Burundi were the first team to arrive in Nairobi and trained on Thursday morning while Ethiopia’s Walya Antelopes arrived and flew straight to Eldoret from where they will travel by road to their match venue in Kakamega.Tanzania arrive on Friday and will head straight to Machakos while Zanzibar will be travelling to the capital from Mombasa on the Madaraka Express train. Uganda travel by road and will connect to Kakamega from the Malaba border point.-Musonye lashes Zimbabwe-“They were the ones who asked whether they can come and we thought because of the problems they have, let them come play football.”Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAMeanwhile, Musonye has launched a tirade against Zimbabwe who pulled out of the tournament on Wednesday, despite earlier having confirmed participation. The Southern Africans cited security concerns around their exit.“They should pull out and don’t talk about Kenya. They don’t know Kenya. What insecurity is there? League games have been played there and not a single incident has been seen. We didn’t even approach them to come. They were the ones who asked whether they can come and we thought because of the problems they have, let them come play football,” an angered Musonye said.He went on to allege that there might be sabotage in the pull out but insists the tournament will go on even without them.His sentiments were shared by FKF boss Nick Mwendwa who said they were hugely disappointed that Zimbabwe will not be available and insinuated they are expected CAF to serve sanctions on them.“Before going for a tournament, you have to sign some documents with CAF and FIFA and failure to honor those tournaments after signing comes with some sanctions. We were ready and had prepared for them to come after the president confirmed to us in Sudan,” Mwendwa recounted.-Kisumu Stadium-Ethiopia national football team arrived on Thursday, 30th November 2017 at the Eldoret Airport. Photo/COURTESYAt the same time, the Moi Stadium in Kisumu initially set to host Group A matches but struck off due to fears over the political climate might get at most three matches, depending on what the LOC will decide.Mwendwa has hinted that one Kenyan game and another one from Group B might be played in Kisumu with the option of adding one of the two semi-final games.Musonye has refuted claims that he ‘denied’ Kisumu a chance to host the tournament.“That is not true. It is just propaganda. We work as a team and this decision was reached after vast consultation. So saying it is Musonye who denied them a chance is very untrue,” the seasoned football administrator and former sports journalist said.The LOC has at the same time urged fans to turn out in large numbers with the gate charges for the tournament lowered. VIP tickets will retail at Sh400 while terrace tickets have been capped at Sh100.“We wanted to make this tournament affordable for our people and we want to ask them to come out and support the tournament in large numbers,” Mwendwa said.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000CECAFA Secretary General Nicholas Musonye addressing the media on the 2017 CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup/ Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYANAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 30- The Local organizing Committee (LOC) for this year’s CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup has assured that preparations for the tournament are in top gear and the embarrassing scenarios witnessed in 2013 during the same tournament in Nairobi will not be repeated.When Kenya last hosted the tournament three years ago, teams were detained in hotels over unpaid bills with the final being delayed for over two hours after Sudan were detained in their hotel as they left for the stadium over unpaid expenditures.last_img read more

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DELIGHT FOR ARENA 7 AS THEY RECEIVE CUSTOMER SERVICE EXCELLENCE AWARD

first_imgBUSINESS: In January last year, Arena 7 entered into a 10 month programme of continuous improvement through Customer Service Excellence Ireland.The initial phase of the programme involved measurement of the then standards of customer service and where opportunities existed to further improve the service offering to the customers at the popular Letterkenny Entertainment Complex. This assessment involved management and staff as well as several customer service audits in order to get a high quality base measurement of standards.All 60 staff at Arena 7 took part in several training initiatives where they themselves created improvement suggestions all aimed at improving the customer experience.Customer Service Excellence Ireland facilitated the workshops but it was the contribution from the Arena 7 team which made the difference through positive and honest suggestions.The Customer Service Excellence programme is one that was used with great success at the London Olympic games 2012 as well as with Chelsea Football Club in their corporate hospitality. In Ireland, the Cliffs of Moher, which is Ireland’s busiest visitor attraction are among 50 companies who now use the programme.Arena 7 is therefore in good company and alongside world leaders in the delivery of its customer service standards.Toni Sidonio of Customer Service Excellence Ireland said, “We provided the training concept and content but the whole idea is that management and staff, such as those in Arena 7, are best placed to create improved change.“They were brilliant and everything discussed was with the customer in mind. Arena 7 are exactly the type of company who we are delighted to work with”.Following the training phase of the CSEI programme, Arena 7 set about to embed the improvements into their day-to-day offer.There followed a series of further customer service visits – all with the aim of capturing excellence in action at the venue. These follow up customer service audits saw a significant and positive increase in the service quality resulting in a score enjoyed only by three other business in Ireland in 2015 who are involved in the CSEI programme.“Arena 7 recently returned a customer experience score of 97% and only two others in Ireland have managed to reach those heights”, said Toni Sidonio of CSEI.Arena 7 is owned and managed by Letterkenny Enda Nicholls who has had a very busy few years in improving the overall offer.The Woodberry Grill in particular is a most popular eating house. Enda has been involved in several Letterkenny Pubs in the past as well as having experience in the New York market.He was involved in the recent purchase of the Brewery Bar at the Market square.Delighted with the Customer Service Excellence Ireland recognition, Enda this week said;“We believe that customer service is at the very centre of all that we do here at Arena 7.“We may have faith, as we do, in our food quality, the quality of our leisure offer, be that bowling, laser, etc…however ultimately it is how people feel while they visit us that is the most important element.“We were delighted to work with CSEI and of course delighted with the recognition, which is a reflection of the team here and their efforts.”DELIGHT FOR ARENA 7 AS THEY RECEIVE CUSTOMER SERVICE EXCELLENCE AWARD was last modified: February 2nd, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Arena 7BusinessCustomer ServiceExcellencenewslast_img read more

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THE DONEGAL HANDICAP WORTH A FLUTTER IN DUBAI!

first_imgPunters at the Meydan Races in Dubai may have felt somebody got the cards mixed up yesterday.The second race on the card was called the Donegal Football Team Cup.No, the county board hasn’t gone and sponsored the race card ahead of some of the world’s richest men. We’re reliably informed the race was named after Jim McGuinness and the boys who are on a well-deserved break there.Word has it that Colm McFadden had fifty quid on the winning horse! THE DONEGAL HANDICAP WORTH A FLUTTER IN DUBAI! was last modified: January 4th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Time to Re-Mind the Brain

first_imgA radical rethink is needed to understand the brain, a neuroscientist complains. A radical rethink is needed to understand human exceptionalism, too.Modularity is a mistake, says Henrik Jörntell on The Conversation. This senior lecturer on neuroscience from Lund University wants science to abandon the idea that the brain is composed of modules like engine parts, where each piece has its own function.Understanding the human brain is arguably the greatest challenge of modern science. The leading approach for most of the past 200 years has been to link its functions to different brain regions or even individual neurons (brain cells). But recent research increasingly suggests that we may be taking completely the wrong path if we are to ever understand the human mind.Appealing though it be, modularity oversimplifies the brain. Evidence has been growing that functions are distributed across the whole brain. He says we need a more holistic way of thinking about it. Experiments with electrodes that seem to support modularity, as well as functional-MRI scans, mislead scientists into a “perfect trap of the intellect,” Jörntell argues. Why would science try to subdivide the brain when the task of all science is to find correlations? That’s ironic. Instead of finding independent functional modules, scientists should look for “the underlying connectivity of brain regions as part of a complex network.”The bottom-up approach of connecting modules into a brain has proven fruitless. “So far, there is no general solution to this problem – just hypotheses in specific cases, such as for recognising people,” he says. To get out of the blind alley, a “radical rethink is needed to understand” the brain. Some neuroscientists are showing a way forward:Some researchers now believe the brain and its diseases in general can only be understood as an interplay between tremendous numbers of neurons distributed across the central nervous system. The function of any one neuron is dependent on the functions of all the thousands of neurons it is connected to. These, in turn, are dependent on those of others. The same region or the same neuron may be used across a huge number of contexts, but have different specific functions depending on the context.A network-centric approach unites rather than subdivides. We shouldn’t think of speech, the sense of self, or diseases of the central nervous system as isolated to one brain region. The brain itself is not isolated to the skull. It is tied into all its sensory organs, interacting with muscles as well. “Without the full picture, we are not likely to be able to successfully cure these and many other conditions,” he says. Sadly, much of the pharmaceutical industry is tied to the modular picture.In this way, neuroscience is gradually losing compass on its purported path towards understanding the brain. It’s absolutely crucial that we get it right. Not only could it be the key to understanding some of the biggest mysteries known to science – such as consciousness – it could also help treat a huge range of debilitating and costly health problems.But does Jörntell’s approach lead down another blind alley? He appears to be a monist and materialist, viewing the mind as a consequence of the physical brain (see first quote above). And he thinks the brain evolved:Connecting back to the physical reality is the only way to understand how information is represented in the brain. One of the reasons we have a nervous system in the first place is that the evolution of mobility required a controlling system. Cognitive, mental functions – and even thoughts – can be regarded as mechanisms that evolved in order to better plan for the consequences of movement and actions.This view cannot be true, because it refutes itself. We would have to conclude that Jörntell’s own reasoning about the brain emerged from the bottom up, from blind actions of evolution that had no goal of rationality. As such, his irrational brain produced an irrational article. And if ‘understanding’ is what he wants, he needs to first understand the evolutionary theory upon which he depends. He misrepresents neo-Darwinism, thinking that requirements can produce solutions out of blind, impersonal processes. You can read requirements for avoiding avalanches to a snowbank all day, but it won’t come up with a controlling system to avoid hitting animals on the way down. In Darwinian theory, no “mechanism” evolves something “in order to better plan” for something else. Planning for consequences requires a mind with a goal. Regretfully, we must relegate Jörntell to the Blind Leaders of the Blind Society.What Does It Mean to Be Human?An article on Mosaic: The Science of Life discusses the work of Clive and Geraldine Finlayson, who have spent 25 years studying Neanderthal remains in caves on the Rock of Gibraltar. Gaia Vince joins them to search for the distinctive traits that identify humanity. Another radical re-think is needed here: the subtitle of the article states, “Gaia Vince discovers that analysing the genetics of ancient humans means changing ideas about our evolution.”Vince notes how different her hosts, the husband-and-wife Finlayson team, appears: “How different we humans can look from each other.” Yet she commits historical racism in the next sentence by sending Neanderthals to the back of the bus: “And yet the people whose home I am about to visit truly were of a different race.” Then she relegates all the archaic humans to other races: Homo heidelbergensis and others, who as far back as 600,000 Darwin Years ago knew how to hunt and use fire and make stone tools. Her historical racism reaches a screechy fortissimo when she admits that Neanderthals, Denisovans and other bore children with modern humans but were somehow “other” than us. Consider: “This geographic separation enabled genetic differences to evolve, eventually resulting in different races, although they were still the same species and would prove able to have fertile offspring together.” Isn’t the essence of racism to de-humanize others, making them members of an outgroup? And yet a few sentences later, she admits that within Gorham Cave, “people not so different from myself once sat here.” Indeed, since her genome shows she is 1% Neanderthal, she feels “it is an extraordinary experience to be so close to the intelligent, resourceful people who bequeathed me some of their genes.”So what does the Gibraltar evidence show Vince about what it means to be human? The Finlaysons have collected surprising evidence of culture in this place – once an idyllic habitat that Clive calls ‘Neanderthal City’. They have found evidence of fire, sleeping chambers, carvings (including a “hashtag” symbol that might be an attempt at symbolic writing), necklaces, stone tools, ornaments, and burial sites for the dead.Other signs of symbolic or ritualistic behaviour, such as the indication that Neanderthals were making and wearing black feather capes or headdresses as well as warm clothes, all point to a social life not so different to the one our African ancestors were experiencing.They seem pretty human. Vince speculates about this society’s demise, perhaps due to climate change rather than competition by modern humans. She thinks they might have been suffering genetic collapse. Does that make sense? They were around for hundreds of thousands of Darwin Years in the evolutionary tale, yet had children by modern humans. Then she makes this remarkable statement:There is far less genetic difference between any two humans than there is between two chimpanzees, for example.Given the wide disparity in features between living humans, which she admitted earlier, on what basis could she classify Neanderthals, Denisovans or the other populations non-human? Wouldn’t that be like chimpanzees committing racism with members of their own species?Gaia Vince then moves to Siberia, where the twin brothers Eske and Rane Willerslev study human remains. Eske studies genetics; Rane studies humanities. Which is the wiser in interpreting evidence? “There exists an uneasy relationship between biology and culture,” Rane told Vince. “Natural scientists claim they can reveal what sort of people moved around, and they are not interested in having their models challenged. But this cannot tell you anything about what people thought or what their culture was.” And for his part, Eske recognizes that genes don’t tell the whole story, either. His own work has overturned hypotheses about the evolution of lactose intolerance and skin color.Back in the Gibraltar museum, Gaia becomes a little unnerved at artist reconstructions of Neanderthals.At the Gibraltar Museum, a pair of Dutch archaeology artists have created life-size replicas of a Neanderthal woman and her grandson, based on finds from nearby. They are naked but for a woven amulet and decorative feathers in their wild hair. The boy, aged about four, is embracing his grandmother, who stands confidently and at ease, smiling at the viewer. It’s an unnerving, extraordinarily powerful connection with someone whose genes I may well share, and I recall Clive’s words from when I asked him if modern humans had simply replaced Neanderthals because of our superior culture.“That replacement theory is a kind of racism. It’s a very colonialist mentality,” he said. “You’re talking almost as if they were another species.”She never did answer the question, “What does it mean to be human?”What it means to be human: it means to be a creature fashioned in the image of God by an all-powerful, all-knowing, wise and good Creator. It means to be fully equipped with other physical creatures of the planet for survival, reproduction and adaptability—but not only for survival alone. To be human is to have unique gifts of intellect, emotions and will, a capacity for art and beauty, a conscience, an inquiring mind, an awareness of one’s createdness, and a longing for significance. It means to be an individual, aware of one’s self, one’s unique identity as a person. It means to be a sinner because of our ancestry in Adam and Eve—the federal representatives of the human race—when they disobeyed their Creator and took their lineage along with them into a broken relationship with God. It means to live in a cursed world, subject to fear, disease and death. It means to live somewhere forever beyond this life. To be fully human means to be reconciled to the Creator through the provision he made for sin—the substitutionary sacrifice of the incarnate God the Son, and thus restored, to enjoy God forever. During this life, it means to love the truth and to love others enough to woo them away from lies, such as materialism, evolutionism, racism and anything else that contradicts what the Creator has declared in his eternal word.(Visited 67 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Nature Clears Your Head

first_imgWhy does exposure to nature produce so many health benefits? Researchers found some possible reasons.Studies have long shown that exposure to outdoor natural environments reduces stress and improves health and well being. How does it do this? An international team of health researchers, publishing in PLoS One, investigated and found that nature slows down a person’s tendency to act impulsively. It delays the urgent need for decision-making, giving the head time to collect its thoughts. The authors also found improvement in space perception. But is this due to Darwinian evolution?Human history evolved around an intimate connection to the natural environment … This has changed dramatically over the last century. The recent shift to over half of the world’s population living in urban areas together with advancements in technology has drastically reduced the amount of time many people spend in contact with nature. This separation of humans from nature may not be inconsequential. A growing body of research is dedicated to exploring how interactions with the natural environment affect human health and wellbeing. To date, researchers have demonstrated that humans gain a plethora of health and wellbeing benefits from nature exposure. Here, we present two studies that test a new theory linking the health benefits of nature exposure to reduced impulsivity via psychologically expanding space perception.Line drawing from “Is Genesis History?” (Compass Cinema)Evolutionists can claim no priority for Darwinism giving humans this benefit. Biblical creationists know that God put the first man and woman in a garden, not in a city. And for ‘nature exposure,’ they didn’t even need clothes at first.The health benefits are now beyond dispute. The question now is why this is so.Further, research has revealed nature not only improves a wide array of health and wellbeing outcomes, but that both experimentally manipulated increases in nature exposure (e.g. [15]) and nature exposure resulting from living and/or working within proximity to ample natural space (e.g., [24–26]) can have these impacts on health. Given this wealth of evidence linking nature exposure to human health and wellbeing, some researchers have shifted from asking whether nature exposure improves health, to asking how nature exposure improves health.Surveying hundreds of participants from several countries in two studies, the authors confirmed that nature exposure lowered impulsivity and enhanced their perception of space. The authors cite numerous references showing that the benefits extend to the body, the mind, and even to society. The responses of participants confirmed these benefits.You can be a citizen scientist for this project. Just go outside and take a walk each day. Travel light; don’t take the city with you.(Visited 305 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Web Squared: When Web 2.0 Meets Internet of Things

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… richard macmanus Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Analysis#Features#Internet of Things#Trends#web Recently Tim O’Reilly and John Battelle released a white paper entitled Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On. It focuses squarely, pardon the pun, on the intersection of social web technologies with the emerging Internet of Things (real world objects connected to the Internet). The ‘web squared’ moniker is, commercially speaking, a none to subtle attempt to re-brand web 2.0. This had to be done so that the conference series of that name, which O’Reilly and Battelle jointly run along with the company TechWeb, remains relevant. But less cynically, the report also nicely applies Web 2.0 principles onto the emerging Internet of Things.The term ‘web squared’ is defined in the report as “web meets world.” The squared bit also references that “the Web opportunity is no longer growing arithmetically; it’s growing exponentially.” Collective Intelligence 2.0The report starts by noting what O’Reilly and Battelle believe was the core proposition of ‘web 2.0’ back in 2004: “Web 2.0 is all about harnessing collective intelligence.” The pair go on to say that web 2.0 is currently being applied to areas they hadn’t predicted in ’04, such as mobile and internet-connected objects. Specifically, sensors are providing a new source of data for web 2.0 techniques. As the report puts it, “collective intelligence applications are no longer being driven solely by humans typing on keyboards but, increasingly, by sensors.”Where the report differs from the traditional view of Internet of Things is that it doesn’t view sensor data as just mechanical data from RFID tags and other non-human sources. The authors argue that humans are producing sensor data of their own, in particular using their mobile phones. They note that today’s smartphones “contain microphones, cameras, motion sensors, proximity sensors, and location sensors (GPS, cell-tower triangulation, and even in some cases, a compass).” No matter what the source of sensor data, after it’s gathered collective intelligence can be applied to it. The authors term this a “virtuous feedback loop,” whereby sensor-based applications get better the more people use them.Information ShadowsAnother key point is that, much like in Web 2.0 apps, there is an entire ecosystem that uses and builds off the data. Real world objects have “information shadows” on the Web (this is a term originally coined by Mike Kuniavsky of ThingM). The example in the report is a book, which has information shadows “on Amazon, on Google Book Search, on Goodreads, Shelfari, and LibraryThing, on eBay and on BookMooch, on Twitter, and in a thousand blogs.”Do We Need RFID? It’d Be Nice… One contentious point in the report is when it questioned whether RFID is actually required to make an Internet of Things. The authors argue that it isn’t: “A bottle of wine on your supermarket shelf (or any other object) needn’t have an RFID tag to join the Internet of Things, it simply needs you to take a picture of its label. Your mobile phone, image recognition, search, and the sentient web will do the rest. We don’t have to wait until each item in the supermarket has a unique machine-readable ID. Instead, we can make do with bar codes, tags on photos, and other “hacks” that are simply ways of brute-forcing identity out of reality.”This line of thought seems to parallel the argument usually put forth by web 2.0 proponents against the top-down Semantic Web: that it isn’t practical to expect publishers to enter metadata into their content, instead let it bubble up with a mix of collective intelligence and machine processing. To hammer home this point, the report claims that “evidence shows that formal systems for adding a priori meaning to digital data are actually less powerful than informal systems that extract that meaning by feature recognition.” They use the example of a book: “an ISBN provides a unique identifier for a book, but a title + author gets you close enough.” Good enough has always been a design principle on the Web, so this makes sense. However, much like the battles back in ’04-’05 to define web 2.0 (or dispute the existence of it) ultimately it’s a moot point. RFID tags will become more common place, it’s just a matter of time. Let’s face it, a ‘smart’ RFID chip on a bottle of wine – one that knows its production and travel history, its temperature, its price relative to similar bottles of wine, etc – will beat human hacking anytime. But, as the report rightly notes, don’t expect that level of automation via RFID any time soon. Our recent post examining the current state of RFID clearly showed that it’s years away.ConclusionTo say that sensor data can be both machine generated (e.g. by RFID chips) and human generated is perhaps trying too hard to force the web 2.0 world into the new emerging Internet of Things. But that’s neither here nor there. Where the ‘web squared’ report is spot on, is its point that applying collective intelligence to sensor data will be a rich vein of opportunity in the coming years. Clearly the web 2.0 philosophy can and will merge with Internet of Things. The report by O’Reilly and Battelle is a great primer for that.Read more about Internet of Thingslast_img read more

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